jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ
This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall
it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ

This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

(Source: ultrafacts, via sugahwaatah)

dynamicafrica:

Multi-award winning Benin songstress Angelique Kidjo is back with a new album titled Eve. 
Stream the album in full and listen to her NPR: All Things Considered interview about it here.

dynamicafrica:

Multi-award winning Benin songstress Angelique Kidjo is back with a new album titled Eve. 

Stream the album in full and listen to her NPR: All Things Considered interview about it here.

(via darkgirlswirl)

diasporanbootyshaking:

Mutuashi from the Democratic Republic of Congo

This is some of the best belly dancing I’ve seen ever. The first 4 minutes are everything. It’s funny how when Africans share something in common with non-Africans, the general assumption is that it was the non-Africans that introduced it to Africans when the continent is the cradle of civilisation. For this reason it’s hard for me to view belly dancing as anything but African.

(via thefemaletyrant)

prepaidafrica:

Kodjo Afate Gnikou has imagination, talent and ambition.

Using rails and belts from old scanners, the case of a discarded desktop computer and even bits of a diskette drive, he has created what is believed to be the first 3D printer made from e-waste. It has taken him several months to put together his experimental device. Lifting designs off a computer, the 3D printer produces physical objects. He shows us by “printing” a small round container.

And it doesn’t stop there – the 33-year old says he believes this model is only the prototype for something much larger. His aim is to one day transport e-waste to Mars to create homes for mankind.

“My dream is to give young people hope and to show that Africa, too, has its place on the global market when it comes to technology. We are able to create things. Why is Africa always lagging behind when it comes to technology?”, he asks.

Some elements had to be bought new but, in all, his printer cost him 100 US dollars to build. Gnikou says his printer can also be useful on a daily basis as it can print various utensils needed in any household, that are not always easy to get hold of.

Though some have called him a dreamer, his hard work has paid off as the young inventor has been rewarded with the NASA International Space Apps Challenge in Paris.

Previously http://prepaidafrica.tumblr.com/post/63812692782/33-year-old-kodjo-afate-gnikou-has-imagination has photo and video of his printer

(via thatnigeriankid)

"Africa is not an UNDERdeveloped continent, it is an OVERexploited one."

Dean Steed @daughterofzami (via daughterofzami)

Yes, yes, yes and yes. I hate when people compare Africa to the developing world and deem it “underdeveloped”. People forget that the “developing” world only formally released Africa of it’s colonial shackles some 50 years ago.

(via thirdworldthoughts)

(via africaisdonesuffering)

quirkyillustrations:

Tribes of Africa Fashion Show

(via ourafrica)

ourafrica:

Africa says Hellofood!


Bringing the world’s best food delivery platform to Africa, Hellofood is the fastest and most convenient way of ordering food online. As of now, the company has launched in GhanaKenyaNigeriaMoroccoIvory Coastand Senegal! Joe Falter, CEO of Hellofood Africa, said “our belief is that ordering food online should be fuss-free, fast and fun”. So they did ! Hellofood signed a great amount of restaurants in main cities of countries mentioned above. Online through the order platform or on the mobile app, ordering food is really convenient. Customers enter their area, find their favorite restaurant near them and with just a few effortless clicks, order over the internet. In a short while, the food is delivered to the doorstep.


About the launch of the mobile application over last months, Ralf Wenzel, co-founder and global managing director, said : “We are impressed by the overwhelming feedback we received from our customers and the worldwide success of our mobile app. Leading the global mobile app market for online food delivery services makes us extremely proud.The success in the first weeks demonstrates the need for innovation.”


Hellofood has quickly become a convenient and much appreciated service in Africa : let’s keep an eye on it! 

(via ourafrica)

black-culture:

5centsapound:

George Osodi: Nigerian Monarchs

*2nd photo: Kumbwada is currently being ruled by Queen Hajiya Haidzatu Ahmed and her court. An ancient curse keeps males off the throne, according to locals. The Queen’s royal title is inherited on the female side of the family, and the current Queen’s daughter, Idris, is the queen’s successor.Kumbwada has been ruled by women for at least six successive generations since its conquest by Princess Magajiya Maimuna of Zaria; the last queen, Queen Hajiya’s grandmother, died at the age of 113.

*last photo: The monarch of Idumuje-Unor, Agbogidi Obi James Anyasi II is the longest reigning king in Africa and the second in the world after King Bhumibol Adelyadej of Thailand reputed as the World’s longest reigning monarch. A phenomenal king headed for the Guinness book of records, he was born on the 6th of March 1924. Obi Anyasi II was crowned king from the Okwunye ruling dynasty on the 9th of October, 1946 at the age of 22, in the hey days of British Colonialism.The Obi who is now 88 years old, has been on the throne for 66 years, a royal longevity never recorded in Nigerian or African contemporary history.

(via contaminatedbreastcheese)

The African Code King

ambitiousblogger:

Raindolf Owusu, a software developer from Ghana, has published this post about some of the challenges a software developer living in African has to cope with. He titles his post, Agonies of an African Programmer, and after reading his piece I realize we share similar sentiments about how the African continent is the new land of opportunity, so long as it’s leaders can get their priorities straight and stop being greedy.

Raindolf outlines seven agonies in his post in which he elaborates on the frustration himself and other developers are faced with. According to Raindolf, technology in Africa is generalized, or thought of as coming in a “box.” Prepackaged, and can be purchased off the shelf. “Let’s all visualize technology as a process and something we are going to build ourselves here in Africa,” he writes. But in order for technology to be visualized there needs to a sustainable infrastructure to enable this realization. The Government and private sector industries must do more to create the backbone where this process can thrive.

Out of all the agonies the African programmer faces, the most poignant, in my opinion, is an unstable source of power. Ghana is still heavily dependent on hydroelectric power, and has been for quite a while—ever since the Akosombo dam was commissioned in 1966. To put things in perspective, that’s 46 years of primarily depending on rain-water to power a country, now of about 25 million people—it’s unsustainable. Ghana is now going through a period known as load-shedding. This is when different electrical grids in the country are rationed with power. So one section of the country may have power from 6am-6pm, and another section from 6pm-6am. I first witnessed this load-shedding back in the 90s, and again in the early 2000s when I lived in Accra, Ghana. It’s unbelievable to learn that it’s still happening after all the talk about the West African Gas Pipeline and how it would provide another source of energy for the country.

Read More

(Source: ambitiousblogger)

nok-ind:

Africa’s Oldest Known Boat
8000 years ago, in the region now known as Nigeria. ”Africa’s oldest known boat” the Dufuna Canoe was discovered near the region of the River Yobe. The Canoe was discovered by a Fulani herdsman in May 1987, in Dufuna Village while digging a well. The canoe’s “almost black wood”, said to be African mahogany, as “entirely an organic material”. Various Radio-Carbon tests conducted in laboratories of reputable Universities in Europe and America indicate that the Canoe is over 8000 years old, thus making it the oldest in Africa and 3rd oldest in the World. Little is known of the period to which the boat belongs, in archaeological terms it is described as an early phase of the Later Stone Age, which began rather more than 12,000 years ago and ended with the appearance of pottery. 

The lab results redefined the pre-history of African water transport, ranking the Dufuna canoe as the world’s third oldest known dugout. Older than it are the dugouts from Pesse, Netherlands, and Noyen-sur-Seine, France. But evidence of an 8,000-year-old tradition of boat building in Africa throws cold water on the assumption that maritime transport developed much later there in comparison with Europe. Peter Breunig of the University of Frankfurt, Germany, an archaeologist involved in the project, says the canoe’s age “forces a reconsideration of Africa’s role in the history of water transport”. It shows, he adds, “that the cultural history of Africa was not determined by Near Eastern and European influences but took its own, in many cases parallel, course”. Breunig, adding that it even outranks in style European finds of similar age. According to him, “The bow and stern are both carefully worked to points, giving the boat a notably more elegant form”, compared to “the dugout made of conifer wood from Pesse in the Netherlands, whose blunt ends and thick sides seem crude”. To go by its stylistic sophistication, he reasons, “It is highly probable that the Dufuna boat does not represent the beginning of a tradition, but had already undergone a long development, and that the origins of water transport in Africa lie even further back in time.”

Egypt’s oldest known boat is 5000 years old.

P. Breunig, The 8000-year-old dugout canoe from Dufuna (NE Nigeria), G. Pwiti and R. Soper (eds.), Aspects of African Archaeology. Papers from the 10th Congress of the PanAfrican Association for Prehistory and related Studies. University of Zimbabwe Publications (Harare 1996) 461-468.
ISBN: 0908307551

Africans were crude people who learnt how to breathe from the white man.
-_____________________________________________________-

nok-ind:

Africa’s Oldest Known Boat
8000 years ago, in the region now known as Nigeria. ”Africa’s oldest known boat” the Dufuna Canoe was discovered near the region of the River Yobe. The Canoe was discovered by a Fulani herdsman in May 1987, in Dufuna Village while digging a well. The canoe’s “almost black wood”, said to be African mahogany, as “entirely an organic material”. Various Radio-Carbon tests conducted in laboratories of reputable Universities in Europe and America indicate that the Canoe is over 8000 years old, thus making it the oldest in Africa and 3rd oldest in the World. Little is known of the period to which the boat belongs, in archaeological terms it is described as an early phase of the Later Stone Age, which began rather more than 12,000 years ago and ended with the appearance of pottery. 
The lab results redefined the pre-history of African water transport, ranking the Dufuna canoe as the world’s third oldest known dugout. Older than it are the dugouts from Pesse, Netherlands, and Noyen-sur-Seine, France. But evidence of an 8,000-year-old tradition of boat building in Africa throws cold water on the assumption that maritime transport developed much later there in comparison with Europe. Peter Breunig of the University of Frankfurt, Germany, an archaeologist involved in the project, says the canoe’s age “forces a reconsideration of Africa’s role in the history of water transport”. It shows, he adds, “that the cultural history of Africa was not determined by Near Eastern and European influences but took its own, in many cases parallel, course”. Breunig, adding that it even outranks in style European finds of similar age. According to him, “The bow and stern are both carefully worked to points, giving the boat a notably more elegant form”, compared to “the dugout made of conifer wood from Pesse in the Netherlands, whose blunt ends and thick sides seem crude”. To go by its stylistic sophistication, he reasons, “It is highly probable that the Dufuna boat does not represent the beginning of a tradition, but had already undergone a long development, and that the origins of water transport in Africa lie even further back in time.”
Egypt’s oldest known boat is 5000 years old.
P. Breunig, The 8000-year-old dugout canoe from Dufuna (NE Nigeria), G. Pwiti and R. Soper (eds.), Aspects of African Archaeology. Papers from the 10th Congress of the PanAfrican Association for Prehistory and related Studies. University of Zimbabwe Publications (Harare 1996) 461-468.
ISBN: 0908307551

Africans were crude people who learnt how to breathe from the white man.

-_____________________________________________________-

b-sama:

“Africa actually enriches Europe; but Africa is made to believe that it needs Europe to rescue it from poverty. Africa’s natural and human resources continue to develop Europe and America, but Africa is made to feel grateful for aid from the same quarters that still sit on the back of the continent. Africa even produces intellectuals who now rationalise this upside-down way of looking at Africa”

- Ngugi wa Thiong’o

(via whiteenslavement)

fumblingtowardshappiness:

dreams-from-my-father:

phantomwise:

Summertime - Angélique Kidjo

I heard this song on the radio today and it might just be the best take on it I’ve heard since Ella Fitzgerald, no joke.

THANK YOU THANK YOU OP

For bringing back Angélique Kidjo on our dashes. Her voice brings back so many childhood memories and this is one of the most amazing things I have ever heard in my life!!

i love this version

Her voice! She and Onyeka Onwenu were my role models for women singing and being absolutely brilliant at it.

(via ekom-aka-makoma)

nok-ind:

They come from the same source more or less.

nok-ind:

They come from the same source more or less.

(Source: nefermaathotep)

beautiful-side-of-africa:

Yassa

My mouth just watered at this sight. My mom needs to cook yassa when next i see her or i need to learn.

beautiful-side-of-africa:

Yassa

My mouth just watered at this sight. My mom needs to cook yassa when next i see her or i need to learn.

(via africaisdonesuffering)

No! This is NOT baby food! this is food for grown folks… food of the gods! who loves me and wants to tell me where I can get this in London to buy? don’t buy it for me, just tell me where to get it and I’ll owe you a cup of coffee or something. For serious…

No! This is NOT baby food! this is food for grown folks… food of the gods! who loves me and wants to tell me where I can get this in London to buy? don’t buy it for me, just tell me where to get it and I’ll owe you a cup of coffee or something. For serious…

(via nigerianculture)