"

Analysts said the recalculated GDP would raise Nigeria’s profile, but change little on the ground.

"Is the money in your bank account more on Sunday than it was on Saturday? If you had no job yesterday, are you going to have a job today?" asked Bismarck Rewane, CEO of Lagos-based consultancy Financial Derivatives.

"If the answer to those questions is ‘no’, then this is an exercise in vanity," he added, though he said the new figure was more accurate.

Many Nigerians shrugged off the GDP news.

"I’m not really impressed. I don’t feel it in my pocket… It’s not the masses who are rich," said Richard Babs-Jonah, 47, a small farmer, expressing the common view that Nigeria’s economy is rigged in favour of a handful of well-connected oligarchs.

"Those controlling the economy, those with government contracts, get all the money."

"

South Africa overtaken as biggest economy in Africa after Nigeria rebases GDP calculation to more than $500bn.

Couldn’t agree more with these two statements. The real test of Nigeria’s developments will be when our national services, infrastructure and resources are well managed, maintained and distributed, and when people no longer feel the need to seek better opportunities abroad. When Nigerians stop leaving the country in droves, or at least try to, that’s when we’ll celebrate the country’s progress.

(via dynamicafrica)

fckyeahprettyafricans:

Ghana vs. Nigeria

(via igboboy)

Amazing places to shop in Nigeria

ourafrica:

Whenever I tell people that I live in Nigeria I know exactly what they are about to ask, “Is there electricity, are the roads sandy, do people live in huts, what do you eat, what did you do about clothes?!” Not only do I find this hilarious, but I also find it inherently irritating - there are a host of beautiful boutiques, stalls and shops in Nigeria that are stocked to the brim with simply amazing pieces. 

So here it is, a list of all my favourite places to shop in South Western Nigeria, ranked from High-Low in terms of budgets. 

  • Florence H: Florence H is possibly my favourite shoe and handbag store on the west coast of Nigeria - not only do I adore the pieces in the store but I admire the attention to detail in the interior design and even down to how the pieces are displayed. The boutique is stocks pieces from fashion legends such as Louboutin and I see this as the first of its kind in terms of high fashion establishments in Nigeria - and it really does prove that Nigerians do respect and appreciate high fashion, so much so that they come down to Florence H to get such chic pieces for red carpet events, dinners and parties. So I must say if you are looking to bump into Kelly Rowland, Brandy or Malika Haqq anytime soon, or if you just want that Chanel you definitely need to visit!  Address: 32 Musa Yaradua Street VI, Lagos | Instagram: @florenceh_

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  • Grey Velvet: This is possibly one of the hottest retailers in Nigeria - not only is it known for its celeb clientele but it focuses on the promotion of signature African brands. Pieces sold are a play on traditional Nigerian pieces such as the age old 'iro and buba' - which the store now stocks in chiffon fabric to appeal to the Spring/Summer season and also to revamp the style and make the younger ages more inclined to purchase or wear them proudly. From Iro and Buba to T shirts to Agbani Darego jeans, how could you go wrong? Most definitely a personal favourite of mine - Ikeja City Mall, Alausa, Ikeja and Centro Lekki Mall, Admiralty Way, Lekki Phaseimage
  • Trinkets and treasures: This is an uber chic, modern jewellery store which stocks everything from Swarovski encrusted rings to signature gold. The pieces are sourced from around the globe and are then carefully categorised into Seasonal collections depending on that seasons trend - for instance this year’s Summer collection was dominated by a warm rose gold hue to contrast with the predominant orange colour for the AW14 season. This then makes pairing jewellery and outfits easier for clients - how nifty! Be sure of nothing but the best customer service and also take a look at exclusive collections in stores now! image

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  • Isale Eko: The first day I walked through this market I was completely lost at the size of it. With every corner we turned there was a burst of colour, soft breeze blowing all types of ankara, chiffon, lace and silk around. It was such an intense walk but I loved everything I had seen! This is one of the best places to shop in Nigeria, especially as a first timer - the hustle and bustle of the market not only startles you but it makes you realise how fierce Nigerians are in terms of their trade - which I absolutely adore! Not only this, but it caters to everyone, everywhere - the market welcomes whatever you have and with a market as huge and intense you will be sure to find what you are looking for

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  • Bere: Ibadan’s hub for traditional fashion and style teems from the centre of the city itself. From the top of this hill in Gbagi you can view the entire city and gape at its ‘legendary’ brown roofs, Bawwa tower, Cathedral and amazing landscape. This is possibly one the best places I know where 'Aso Ofi' and precious coral stones can be bought for special occassions - Usually coming to this market infers that you are getting married soon, walking through the tiny footpaths you are usually showered with blessings from the Mallams and Old women in their stalls. With an amazing atmosphere and a fierce vibe this is an amazing place to come and look at the beginning of Yoruba civilsation and also buy amazing pieces for yourself. 

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Contact me and tell me what you think! 

ourafricablog.com | taraolajide@gmail.com | Perspectivefashion.tumblr.com | Twitter @taraolajide | Instagram @tara_olajide 

(Source: ourafrica)

thefemaletyrant:

nkenten:

 

Traditional Nigerian occupations captured by documentary photographer Muyiwa Osifuye.

Cloth Weaving: Nigeria is famous for the numerous types of fabric which were traditionally woven by hand, but today modern technology has taken over. Fabrics include the famous “Aso oke”, traditionally worn by royalty but nowadays for special occasions, “Adire” or tie and dye and “Ankara” among the Yoruba and “George” among the Igbo. 

Pottery: Among the Yoruba, potters were traditionally women, but in the north they were men. Traditional pots were made for ritual purposes, water vessels and cooking.

Palm Wine Tapping: Wine tapping is another occupation from the past which still continues today. The female or red Abe (Oil palm tree) is used for palm kernels from which you get palm oil used in cooking, manufacture of margarine and soap. The sap of the male or white Abe is used to make Palm wine, which is a popular traditional beer all over West Africa. 

Wood Carving: Wood carvers traditionally built shrines which are used to worship traditional gods and lots of their work centered around masks and figures in this regard. However, they also make lots of figure ornaments and carvings of people and animals. 

Bronze and Metal Casting: Ife and Benin are famous all over the world for their bronze and metal carvings. Traditionally a lot of these elaborate masks and carvings were made to decorate the royal palaces, or for use in ceremonial occasions and traditional shrines. Sadly a lot of these national heirlooms are now housed in museums or private collections around the world.

These are really pretty, and I love how some of these photos have younger ones in them, learning the craft and all.

But really “ankara” among the Yoruba? Ankara is not woven, it’s printed. Basically it should not have been on this list.

(via blackandstylish)

dynamicafrica:

Nigerian musician Seun Kuti speaks out on Nigeria’s anti-gay law.
I’m writing to condemn the recent anti-gay bill signed into law by our President Jonathan Goodluck. This law – which contains penalties of up to 14 years in prison for anyone in a same-sex marriage or civil union, 10 years for anyone who attends a same-sex wedding, 10 years for anyone involved with an LGBT organization, and even 10 years for anyone who shows affection for someone of the same sex – should be cast out. Since the law was passed, police across Nigeria have begun arresting and torturing dozens of our fellow citizens suspected of being gay. Don’t forget that in some of our states, if you are found guilty of being gay, you could be stoned to death.
First of all, this law was unnecessary. There is not space in the existing constitution for gay marriage. Our constitution is very definitive of marriage as a union between man and woman. I see the signing in of this law for what it was: a cheap shot by an under-achieving government to discriminate against people because they are different.
The president of Nigeria has a PhD, so he should understand better than most the implications of the law. Even if he couldn’t stop the senate from passing the bill, he had the power to delay signing it as a way of protecting the gay community. The President has had the Petroleum Industry Bill in front of him for years, and he and our senators have stalled on the bill calling for harsher punishment for corruption. Meanwhile, Nigeria’s senate has just sanctioned pedophilia in our constitution (girls that are as young as 9 years old can continue to be married in if they are “physically developed enough” according to their parents or prospective husbands) – so this the ban on homosexuality can hardly be a so-called “moral” issue. This is simply a move for cheap political points. Meanwhile, people’s lives hang in the balance.
Today I am writing this not as a fight for “gay rights”, I am fighting for all rights. People should be allowed to express themselves freely and this includes their sexuality. I believe all gay people should come out and organize openly. I expect that society should allow them live their lives as they please.
It’s not a cultural thing – it’s a sexual thing. I have even heard people say it’s Western culture imposed on us and if the West doesn’t recognize polygamy we should not accept homosexuality. This is the kind of scary ignorance that this kind of law will foster. (I can say for a fact that the constitution of Nigeria does not recognize polygamy. We have customary laws that are non-binding, but our secular courts and national constitution does not allow polygamy even though it’s “our culture.”)
I believe in education as the answer to any problem and I know this law does not educate positively. It just criminalizes and institutionalizes hate towards the gay community.
Here’s a call to action: I believe the gay community should come out! They need to put love above fear. I also believe that gay people in Africa not just Nigeria who are being targeted like this should put pressure on the West by claiming asylum in their countries. I think we are about to see a new wave of sexual refugees!
Love over fear should be the way forward.
-Seun Kuti
(via okayafrica)

dynamicafrica:

Nigerian musician Seun Kuti speaks out on Nigeria’s anti-gay law.

I’m writing to condemn the recent anti-gay bill signed into law by our President Jonathan Goodluck. This law – which contains penalties of up to 14 years in prison for anyone in a same-sex marriage or civil union, 10 years for anyone who attends a same-sex wedding, 10 years for anyone involved with an LGBT organization, and even 10 years for anyone who shows affection for someone of the same sex – should be cast out. Since the law was passed, police across Nigeria have begun arresting and torturing dozens of our fellow citizens suspected of being gay. Don’t forget that in some of our states, if you are found guilty of being gay, you could be stoned to death.

First of all, this law was unnecessary. There is not space in the existing constitution for gay marriage. Our constitution is very definitive of marriage as a union between man and woman. I see the signing in of this law for what it was: a cheap shot by an under-achieving government to discriminate against people because they are different.

The president of Nigeria has a PhD, so he should understand better than most the implications of the law. Even if he couldn’t stop the senate from passing the bill, he had the power to delay signing it as a way of protecting the gay community. The President has had the Petroleum Industry Bill in front of him for years, and he and our senators have stalled on the bill calling for harsher punishment for corruption. Meanwhile, Nigeria’s senate has just sanctioned pedophilia in our constitution (girls that are as young as 9 years old can continue to be married in if they are “physically developed enough” according to their parents or prospective husbands) – so this the ban on homosexuality can hardly be a so-called “moral” issue. This is simply a move for cheap political points. Meanwhile, people’s lives hang in the balance.

Today I am writing this not as a fight for “gay rights”, I am fighting for all rights. People should be allowed to express themselves freely and this includes their sexuality. I believe all gay people should come out and organize openly. I expect that society should allow them live their lives as they please.

It’s not a cultural thing – it’s a sexual thing. I have even heard people say it’s Western culture imposed on us and if the West doesn’t recognize polygamy we should not accept homosexuality. This is the kind of scary ignorance that this kind of law will foster. (I can say for a fact that the constitution of Nigeria does not recognize polygamy. We have customary laws that are non-binding, but our secular courts and national constitution does not allow polygamy even though it’s “our culture.”)

I believe in education as the answer to any problem and I know this law does not educate positively. It just criminalizes and institutionalizes hate towards the gay community.

Here’s a call to action: I believe the gay community should come out! They need to put love above fear. I also believe that gay people in Africa not just Nigeria who are being targeted like this should put pressure on the West by claiming asylum in their countries. I think we are about to see a new wave of sexual refugees!

Love over fear should be the way forward.

-Seun Kuti

(via okayafrica)

(via aquaticspacepussy)

thefemaletyrant:

atane:

This is great. Three things.

1. I’m glad they didn’t list Ijaw. Ijaw is a catch all term of diverse groups of people, many of who are not linguistically or culturally related. You could be talking about people as far away in Ondo state like the Apoi who now speak Yoruba dialects. They have little similar in culture, language and tradition as say a Kalabari person in Rivers State or a Buseni person in Bayelsa, but they all fall under the Ijaw umbrella. Many think Ijaw is one group of people. It is not. Many Nigerians don’t know that.

2. Happy to see my father’s people, the Andoni listed. Most Nigerians don’t know who they are, and they too fall under the very wide Ijaw umbrella. However, Andoni excludes the other clans that collectively form a group. If you aren’t going to list them all individually, then to cover them all, the proper term would be ‘Obolo’. Obolo is not just a language, it doubles as a grouping. That said, not all in the group will even speak the Obolo language. For instance, there are groups of us in Ohafia clans in Abia State that speak Igbo and not the Obolo language. Many Andoni people speak Igbo due to intermarriage, trade and shared cultures, but they aren’t Igbo. Those that went to Igbo speaking areas adopted the language, others speak it as a second language. There has been a lot of shared cultures in these areas. The Ibeno in Akwa Ibom speak Obolo. They share culture with the Andoni, but they are a distinctly different group.

3. As exhaustive as this list is, there are dozens of groups left out, most notably the Ogoni. One wonders if there aren’t really over 500 distinct groups in Nigeria. A lot of people get lumped together that don’t need to be (see Ijaw people for instance). Smaller groups with little political clout get swallowed by larger groups, and it also boosts the more dominant group’s numbers. There are so many groups of people in Nigeria, it is daunting. Below are some that were left out. Of course, there are way more than this.

Ogoni people. Ken Saro-Wiwa is probably the most famous Ogoni person. Together with the Ogoni Nine, he brought the exploitation of the Niger Delta by multinationals like Shell to the world. Not including the Ogoni is a huge omission.

Apoi people. They speak Yoruba, but they aren’t Yoruba people. They are in Ondo state. They are an Ijaw group.

Kalabari people.

Nembe and Akassa peoples. The Nembe had an illustrious kingdom that was ravaged by the British. King Koko is probably the most well known leader of the Nembe Kingdom. He fought against the British. After the British sacked Nembe, they deposed him and he died in exile. Many Nembe people were killed at the hands of the British.

Ikwerre people. Sometimes they get lumped in with Igbo, and even though they are “Igboid” in culture and linguistically similar, they are distinct enough to be their own group, which they are at this point.

Ibani people. They are in Bonny Island. It was once the Kingdom of Bonny. Their downfall came at the hands of the British.

Nkoro people. If you’ve ever been to Rivers State, these are the people in Opobo. I’m sure many have heard of King Jaja of Opobo. He was really an Igbo, but he rose to leadership. Jaja formed Opobo which is further inland because of issues between Ibani, Nkoro and other indigenous peoples. These people are now collectively recognized as Ijaw, but we should understand that they are distinct ethnic groups.

Arogbo people. The Arogbo speak a mix of Yoruba and several Ijaw dialects due to their history of migration. They’re in Ondo state and are an Ijaw group.

Gbaran people.

Buseni people.

Bassan people. Not to be confused with Bassa in North Nigeria on the list. Bassan are in the Niger Delta (Bayelsa). They’ve been battling with Chevron for years. Chevron has been carrying out human rights abuses in Niger Delta for a long time and they have gotten away with it. Chevron is brazen with their actions, which included flying in armed personnel via helicopter to shoot and kill unarmed protestors. See this. This is one of the reasons why there is armed militancy in the Delta and kidnappings of western/white oil workers and expats happens. Some of the militants are Bassan.

There are many more. I’d say the Niger Delta area alone easily has a third or more of all the groups in Nigeria.

This is so important, it’s amazing how little Nigerians know of other ethnic groups. Another thing that really gets me is when people from the South group the entire North as “Hausa” when it is mostly Hausa *speaking* and then again not every one in Northern Nigeria speaks or even understands Hausa.

(Source: numbla)

dynamicafrica:

Photography Feature: ‘Snap it Oga’.

Lagos is not an easy city to photograph. Living in Lagos itself is not an easy thing to do. But the city is always alive, teeming with life and bustling to the brim with electricity (in the figurative sense) as feet, hands, bodies and hearts go about their daily hustle in a city that resembles nowhere else on this earth.

Lagos, Lasgidi, Eko, City of Excellence, or whatever name you use to refer to one of Africa’s leading cities, is a place that gives life to a photographer’s lens. But we all know that same old drill of having to see images in foreign media sensationalize an almost sadistic relationship they have in highlighting the negative aspects of African environments and showcasing our sufferings. 

As a self-described “photography enthusiast” from India currently residing in Lagos, based on images found through a simple Google search, Devesh did not know what exactly to expect when moving to the city. He just knew it didn’t look enthralling in any sense of the word. Now, however, after being in Lagos for several months he has become a keen photographer of his new temporary home. From motorcyle taxis to market women, art works to artisans, he chronicles his image-taking adventures in a blog titled ‘Snap it, Oga!' that shows a Lagos that is more than familiar to anyone native Lagosian.

Here’s what he had to say about his photographic journey in Lagos, thus far: 

I came here seven months back and before coming here I Googled about Lagos and Nigeria. I am afraid, I didn’t find a lot of positive stories and pictures in search results that time. 

Once I reached here and started to move around Lagos, I realized there are lot of positives here which everyone conveniently ignores.

There is art here almost everywhere…on Danfos, on streets, on shop signboards, on school walls and so on.

The Nigerian love for food, football and music is just infectious. I thought it would be great to capture all of this and showcase it online. 

I decided to start a blog for my Nigerian pictures to showcase that this country is so much more than the negative P.R. it gets  The first few people I photographed in Lagos would say “Snap it, Oga” when I was looking at them through my camera’s viewfinder. The name stayed on and I named my blog ‘Snap It Oga’!

soulbrotherv2:

9-Year-Old Nigerian Becomes World’s Youngest Microsoft Certified Specialist

BY LIANE MEMBIS
He’s a Nigerian. And he’s only 9-years-old.
Jomiloju Tunde-Oladipo recently became one of the world’s youngest certified Microsoft Office Specialists for Office Word 2010, the Nigerian Tribune reports.
Jomiloju, a primary student at Role Model School in Lagos, broke the record of a fellow Nigerian student Seyi-Ojo Anjolaoluwa who became a Microsoft certified professional at the age of 10.  [Continue reading at Clutch Magazine.]


I was hurt when my uncle told me my degree was useless in the Nigerian tech industry but when little ones are doing so good, who’s to say what will happen in the next 5 years?
I smiled when I read his name, talk about living up to your destiny!

soulbrotherv2:

9-Year-Old Nigerian Becomes World’s Youngest Microsoft Certified Specialist

BY LIANE MEMBIS

He’s a Nigerian. And he’s only 9-years-old.

Jomiloju Tunde-Oladipo recently became one of the world’s youngest certified Microsoft Office Specialists for Office Word 2010, the Nigerian Tribune reports.

Jomiloju, a primary student at Role Model School in Lagos, broke the record of a fellow Nigerian student Seyi-Ojo Anjolaoluwa who became a Microsoft certified professional at the age of 10.  [Continue reading at Clutch Magazine.]

I was hurt when my uncle told me my degree was useless in the Nigerian tech industry but when little ones are doing so good, who’s to say what will happen in the next 5 years?

I smiled when I read his name, talk about living up to your destiny!

(via tanbrownsings)

37thstate:

Nigeria’s Kunle Afolayan: I want more than Nollywood

Nigerian filmmaker Kunle Afolayan disusses his $2m film, October 1 with the BBC and how we would like to be compared with Quentin Tarantino

yagazieemezi:

VIDEO SHORT:

Check out this pretty cool commercial for Star Beer highlighting some of Nigeria’s triumphs.

(via soundofthegenuine)

Ethnicity in Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Ethnicity is one of the keys to understanding Nigeria’s pluralistic society. It distinguishes groupings of peoples who for historical reasons have come to be seen as distinctive—by themselves and others—on the basis of locational origins and a series of other cultural markers. Experience in the postindependence period fostered a widespread belief that modern ethnicity affects members’ life chances. In Nigerian colloquial usage, these collectivities were commonly called “tribes.” In the emergent Nigerian national culture, this topic was discussed widely as “tribalism,” a morally reprehensible term whose connotations were similar to American terms, such as “discrimination,” “racism,” or “prejudice.” Nigerian national policies have usually fostered tolerance and appreciation for cultural differences, while trying at the same time to suppress unfair treatment based on ethnic prejudice. This long-term campaign involved widespread support in educated circles to replace the term “tribe” or “tribal” with the more universally applicable concept of ethnicity. Nevertheless, older beliefs died slowly, and ethnic identities were still a vital part of national life in 1990.

The ethnic variety was dazzling and confusing. Estimates of the number of distinct ethnic groupings varied from 250 to as many as 400. The most widely used marker was that of language. In most cases, people who spoke a distinct language having a separate term for the language and/or its speakers saw themselves, or were viewed by others, as ethnically different. Language groupings were numbered in the 1970s at nearly 400, depending upon disagreements over whether or not closely related languages were mutually intelligible. Language groupings sometimes shifted their distinctiveness rather than displaying clear boundaries. Manga and Kanuri speakers in northeastern Nigeria spoke easily to one another. But in the major Kanuri city of Maiduguri, 160 kilometers south of Manga-speaking areas, Manga was considered a separate language. Kanuri and Manga who lived near each other saw themselves as members of the same ethnic group; others farther away did not.

Read More

(Source: countrystudies.us, via thatnigeriankid)


 Aso Oke 
The Soho Sister

Dance from Nigeria called Skelewu.

Music Skelewu by Davido, Choreo by LipStik Bandits

(Source: ourafrica)

ourafrica:

Nigeria ! HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY 

As you kukere and skelewu all week, here are a few interesting facts about this wonderful country and people.

  1. Most populous country in Africa.
  2. Ile-Ife, in present day Osun State, was paved as early as 1000AD, with decorations that originated from Ancient America suggesting there might have been contact between the Yorubas and the Ancient Americans half a millenium before Columbus ‘discovered’ America.
  3. The Walls of Benin (800-1400AD), in present day Edo State, are the longest ancient earthworks in the world, and probably the largest man-made structure on earth.
  4.  Sarki Muhammad Kanta The Great of Kebbi, was the only ruler who resisted control by Songhai, West Africa’s greatest empire at that time.
  5. The Yoruba tribe has the highest rate of twin births in the world.

yagazieemezi:

SO excited for the new tees by Allen&Fifth!! Ese Aigbogun (not pictured) is the creative genius behind the shirts’ designs and I highly recommend you visit the store to see the rest of them from past seasons.

"Allen & Fifth represents two distinct cultures, Lagos (Allen Avenue) and New York (Fifth Avenue), both fast paced cities with so much life and energy to tap from. My tees are designed to strike a chord of nostalgia and curiosity but more importantly, to enlighten people about what Africa and Africans have to offer."

I have quite a few of her old designs and I simply love the t-shirts because of their simplistic fit and feel. You’d be surprised by how hard it is to buy a t-shit with a brilliant design and durability with none of those annoying three-quarters sleeves and equally annoying 8-shape fit found in the women’s section. Here’s to some awesome clothes that can be worn comfortably by all. 

Models: Sarah Nicole Francois & Steven Onoja