dynamicafrica:

Great Concern As Parents of Missing #Chibok Schoolgirls Tragically Pass Away.
This headline is so shocking and heartbreaking it’s almost unbelievable. 11 parents of the missing Chibok schoolgirls have died or have been killed in the three months since their abduction.
According to a report by AP, seven of the girls’ fathers were among over 50 bodies that were brought to a hospital in the area after an attack on the nearby village of Kautakari this month. Four more parents are said to have died from heart failure, high blood pressure and other illnesses many blame on the trauma sustained from this incident.
Speaking out on this issue, community leader Pogo Bitrus has said, “one father of two of the girls kidnapped just went into a kind of coma and kept repeating the names of his daughters, until life left him.”
Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan, who has been heavily criticized for his slow response and the ineffective manner in which he has been handling both this situation and the greater Boko Haram threat, met with some of the victim’s parents and their classmates on Tuesday where he promised to continue efforts to bring back the girls alive.
Meanwhile, the town of Chibok seems to be in more and more danger as Boko Haram continue to gain ground in the surrounding area. Over the weekend, the terrorist group launched several raids in northeastern Nigerian towns and villages where they also attacked an army base in the strategic town of Damboa. This particular attack saw as many as 15, 000 civilians fleeing the area as a result.
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There’s a special place in hell for jonathan for what he’s rendered nigeria into.

dynamicafrica:

Great Concern As Parents of Missing #Chibok Schoolgirls Tragically Pass Away.

This headline is so shocking and heartbreaking it’s almost unbelievable. 11 parents of the missing Chibok schoolgirls have died or have been killed in the three months since their abduction.

According to a report by AP, seven of the girls’ fathers were among over 50 bodies that were brought to a hospital in the area after an attack on the nearby village of Kautakari this month. Four more parents are said to have died from heart failure, high blood pressure and other illnesses many blame on the trauma sustained from this incident.

Speaking out on this issue, community leader Pogo Bitrus has said, “one father of two of the girls kidnapped just went into a kind of coma and kept repeating the names of his daughters, until life left him.”

Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan, who has been heavily criticized for his slow response and the ineffective manner in which he has been handling both this situation and the greater Boko Haram threat, met with some of the victim’s parents and their classmates on Tuesday where he promised to continue efforts to bring back the girls alive.

Meanwhile, the town of Chibok seems to be in more and more danger as Boko Haram continue to gain ground in the surrounding area. Over the weekend, the terrorist group launched several raids in northeastern Nigerian towns and villages where they also attacked an army base in the strategic town of Damboa. This particular attack saw as many as 15, 000 civilians fleeing the area as a result.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | PinterestSoundcloud | Mixcloud

There’s a special place in hell for jonathan for what he’s rendered nigeria into.

(via dynastylnoire)

atane:

The theft of the Benin Bronzes.

The Benin Bronzes are a collection of more than 3000 artifacts from the Kingdom of Benin, which is in present day Nigeria.

Many of the Benin Bronze artifacts are currently housed in the British Museum, as well as other museums across Western Europe, and the United States.

Some of the priceless pieces are procured by wealthy art collectors through auctions, like this Bronze Memorial Head sold by Christie’s Auction House in London for 1.2 million pounds in 1989. The British Museum itself sold numerous pieces, as late as 1972. (Source)

Privately (black market), collectors acquire all kinds of Benin art not just limited to bronze/brass. Rare artifacts made from ivory, clay, wood, terracotta, and other materials all command high prices. Many of these are in the hands of German estates. German collectors bought them first when a sizable amount was sold in the late 1890s.

It needs to be stressed that these weren’t an archaeological find. These are looted artifacts. Under the command of Admiral Sir Harry Rawson, the artifacts were stolen by the British Army in the Benin Expedition of 1897. They deliberately destroyed, plundered, and burned Benin down to the ground. To date, no one knows how many Edo people were killed in Benin by the British. The expedition brought an end to the Kingdom of Benin. Click here for a short video on how the looting occurred. 

Only a handful of these artifacts are in Nigeria today. Nigeria had to buy back 50 pieces of their own artifacts from the British Museum. The British Museum refuses to return the rest, despite being fully aware that they were stolen.

Click here for a listing of pictures and details on some of the various Benin artifacts housed mostly in museums in Europe and the US.

More videos: Vid 1 - Vid 2

(via barkor)

(Source: atane, via lagos2bahia)

The 53 girls that escaped are not of the 219 that were abducted earlier this year. Boko Haram’s history of abducting women and children goes far back.

thenigerianassassin:

The Wall of Benin

Created by the Edo people of the Benin Empire(1447-1897). Currently located in Benin City, Nigeria.

"They extend for some 16,000 kilometres in all, in a mosaic of more than 500 interconnected settlement boundaries. They cover 6,500 square kilometres and were all dug by the Edo people. In all, they are four times longer than the Great Wall of China, and consumed a hundred times more material than the Great Pyramid of Cheops. They took an estimated 150 million hours of digging to construct, and are perhaps the largest single archaeological phenomenon on the planet."-Fred Pearce

Yet ignorant people still maintain Africa has no significant achievements.

(via sugahwaatah)

(Source: atane)

dynamicafrica:

The Brazilian Baracoon, built in the 1840s and held up to 40 slaves at a time in Badagry, Lagos State. 
This ancient town of Badagry was founded around l425 A.D. Before its existence, people lived along the Coast of Gberefu and this area later gave birth to the town of Badagry. It is the second largest commercial town in Lagos State, located an hour from Lagos and half-hour from the Republic of Benin. The town of Badagry is bordered on the south by the Gulf of Guinea and surrounded by creeks, islands and a lake. The ancient town served mainly the Oyo Empire, which was comprised of Yoruba and Ogu people. Today, the Aworis and Egun are mainly the people who reside in the town of Badagry as well as in Ogun State in Nigeria and in the neighbouring Republic of Benin.
The name originated from the fact that the people of Badagry’s means of livelihood are farming, fishing and salt making due to the availability of trees and presence of ocean water respectively. The natives believed that Badagry was founded by a famous farmer called Agbedeh who maintained a farm which became popular it was named after him. The word Greme meant farm in Ogu language and a visit to Agbedeh’s farm brought about the word and Agbedegreme and its usage meaning Agbedeh’s farm. It was then coined to Agbadagari by the Yoruba inhabitants and later corrupted to Badagry by the European slave merchants before the end of the seventeenth century.
Badagry is majorly recognised for its slave trade by the foreigners.
The trade began in 1440 with Prince Henry, the navigator of Portugal.  By 1593, 12,000 slaves had been sold to labour markets in Italy and Spain. One horse was traded for 25-30 slaves in the 1440s and the value of African slaves rose from six to eight slaves per horse. By the 16th century, there were over 32,000 slaves in Portugal.
Along the line, Seriki Faremi Williams, an African slave appealed a bargain with his buyers. He agreed to supply slaves to the foreigners in exchange for his freedom. The Nigerian, specifically of the Yoruba tribe to be exact, got his wish and was immediately set free to begin business. He returned to Badagry and built the Brazillian Baracoon with the mission to transport as much slaves as possible. He raided villages and captured their natives and sold them to the middlemen who eventually re-sold them as slaves to European slave merchants.
The baracoons were small rooms where up to 40 slaves were kept, all in upright position for days before they were shipped across the lagoon via the point of no return into the waiting ships. The group of houses, now mostly residential, were all at one point or the other used to keep slaves waiting to be transported. Vlekete square, founded in 1510, was known to be the slave market in Badagry.
The slave merchants began to work on his intelligence and that of African Leaders involved and enticed them with material gifts. Slaves were then exchanged for merchandises as little as whisky, tobacco, rum, cuppino glass, canons, iron bars, brass, woollen, cotton, linen, silk, beads, guns, gun powder amongst others. Because they knew it was of paramount importance to these natives.
Historically speaking, Badagry was the first and last port of call. When the ships arrive to pick these slaves, they would be brought out from the hole in which they were put and taken to a place called ‘The Point of No Return’. This process involved the crossing of slaves through the ocean that links the Badagry port to this point. When the slaves have been crossed over, they would walk about 20miles to the point.
In between, they would each approach a coven where they would drink from a well that contained a silver shiny liquid claimed to be water and recite a verse. This initiation would wipe out there memory so as to avoid foreknowledge of their whereabouts. The curator further explained that these slaves immediately loose their memory and do not regain it until they reach their final destination. Only the strong ones make it to the New World and maybe luckily, back.
(x)

dynamicafrica:

The Brazilian Baracoon, built in the 1840s and held up to 40 slaves at a time in Badagry, Lagos State.

This ancient town of Badagry was founded around l425 A.D. Before its existence, people lived along the Coast of Gberefu and this area later gave birth to the town of Badagry. It is the second largest commercial town in Lagos State, located an hour from Lagos and half-hour from the Republic of Benin. The town of Badagry is bordered on the south by the Gulf of Guinea and surrounded by creeks, islands and a lake. The ancient town served mainly the Oyo Empire, which was comprised of Yoruba and Ogu people. Today, the Aworis and Egun are mainly the people who reside in the town of Badagry as well as in Ogun State in Nigeria and in the neighbouring Republic of Benin.

The name originated from the fact that the people of Badagry’s means of livelihood are farming, fishing and salt making due to the availability of trees and presence of ocean water respectively. The natives believed that Badagry was founded by a famous farmer called Agbedeh who maintained a farm which became popular it was named after him. The word Greme meant farm in Ogu language and a visit to Agbedeh’s farm brought about the word and Agbedegreme and its usage meaning Agbedeh’s farm. It was then coined to Agbadagari by the Yoruba inhabitants and later corrupted to Badagry by the European slave merchants before the end of the seventeenth century.

Badagry is majorly recognised for its slave trade by the foreigners.

The trade began in 1440 with Prince Henry, the navigator of Portugal.  By 1593, 12,000 slaves had been sold to labour markets in Italy and Spain. One horse was traded for 25-30 slaves in the 1440s and the value of African slaves rose from six to eight slaves per horse. By the 16th century, there were over 32,000 slaves in Portugal.

Along the line, Seriki Faremi Williams, an African slave appealed a bargain with his buyers. He agreed to supply slaves to the foreigners in exchange for his freedom. The Nigerian, specifically of the Yoruba tribe to be exact, got his wish and was immediately set free to begin business. He returned to Badagry and built the Brazillian Baracoon with the mission to transport as much slaves as possible. He raided villages and captured their natives and sold them to the middlemen who eventually re-sold them as slaves to European slave merchants.

The baracoons were small rooms where up to 40 slaves were kept, all in upright position for days before they were shipped across the lagoon via the point of no return into the waiting ships. The group of houses, now mostly residential, were all at one point or the other used to keep slaves waiting to be transported. Vlekete square, founded in 1510, was known to be the slave market in Badagry.

The slave merchants began to work on his intelligence and that of African Leaders involved and enticed them with material gifts. Slaves were then exchanged for merchandises as little as whisky, tobacco, rum, cuppino glass, canons, iron bars, brass, woollen, cotton, linen, silk, beads, guns, gun powder amongst others. Because they knew it was of paramount importance to these natives.

Historically speaking, Badagry was the first and last port of call. When the ships arrive to pick these slaves, they would be brought out from the hole in which they were put and taken to a place called ‘The Point of No Return’. This process involved the crossing of slaves through the ocean that links the Badagry port to this point. When the slaves have been crossed over, they would walk about 20miles to the point.

In between, they would each approach a coven where they would drink from a well that contained a silver shiny liquid claimed to be water and recite a verse. This initiation would wipe out there memory so as to avoid foreknowledge of their whereabouts. The curator further explained that these slaves immediately loose their memory and do not regain it until they reach their final destination. Only the strong ones make it to the New World and maybe luckily, back.

(x)

(via nigerianostalgia)

Nigeria Should Change Name to “United Rep. Of Songhai” - Prof. Akin Oyebode

(Source: youtube.com)

saharareporters:

Nigeria Should Change Name to “United Rep. Of Songhai” - Prof. Akin Oyebode

Professor Akin Oyebode, is a Professor of International Law And Jurisprudence at the University of Lagos (UNILAG), who is also a delegate at the ongoing National Confab in Abuja. He suggested here in this interview, among other things, that “Nigeria” is a colonial name bequeathed by the colonial ruler, Lord Lugard, as suggested to him by his “girl friend”, Flora Shaw.

WATCH HERE…

"

Analysts said the recalculated GDP would raise Nigeria’s profile, but change little on the ground.

"Is the money in your bank account more on Sunday than it was on Saturday? If you had no job yesterday, are you going to have a job today?" asked Bismarck Rewane, CEO of Lagos-based consultancy Financial Derivatives.

"If the answer to those questions is ‘no’, then this is an exercise in vanity," he added, though he said the new figure was more accurate.

Many Nigerians shrugged off the GDP news.

"I’m not really impressed. I don’t feel it in my pocket… It’s not the masses who are rich," said Richard Babs-Jonah, 47, a small farmer, expressing the common view that Nigeria’s economy is rigged in favour of a handful of well-connected oligarchs.

"Those controlling the economy, those with government contracts, get all the money."

"

South Africa overtaken as biggest economy in Africa after Nigeria rebases GDP calculation to more than $500bn.

Couldn’t agree more with these two statements. The real test of Nigeria’s developments will be when our national services, infrastructure and resources are well managed, maintained and distributed, and when people no longer feel the need to seek better opportunities abroad. When Nigerians stop leaving the country in droves, or at least try to, that’s when we’ll celebrate the country’s progress.

(via dynamicafrica)

fckyeahprettyafricans:

Ghana vs. Nigeria

(via igboboy)

Amazing places to shop in Nigeria

ourafrica:

Whenever I tell people that I live in Nigeria I know exactly what they are about to ask, “Is there electricity, are the roads sandy, do people live in huts, what do you eat, what did you do about clothes?!” Not only do I find this hilarious, but I also find it inherently irritating - there are a host of beautiful boutiques, stalls and shops in Nigeria that are stocked to the brim with simply amazing pieces. 

So here it is, a list of all my favourite places to shop in South Western Nigeria, ranked from High-Low in terms of budgets. 

  • Florence H: Florence H is possibly my favourite shoe and handbag store on the west coast of Nigeria - not only do I adore the pieces in the store but I admire the attention to detail in the interior design and even down to how the pieces are displayed. The boutique is stocks pieces from fashion legends such as Louboutin and I see this as the first of its kind in terms of high fashion establishments in Nigeria - and it really does prove that Nigerians do respect and appreciate high fashion, so much so that they come down to Florence H to get such chic pieces for red carpet events, dinners and parties. So I must say if you are looking to bump into Kelly Rowland, Brandy or Malika Haqq anytime soon, or if you just want that Chanel you definitely need to visit!  Address: 32 Musa Yaradua Street VI, Lagos | Instagram: @florenceh_

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  • Grey Velvet: This is possibly one of the hottest retailers in Nigeria - not only is it known for its celeb clientele but it focuses on the promotion of signature African brands. Pieces sold are a play on traditional Nigerian pieces such as the age old 'iro and buba' - which the store now stocks in chiffon fabric to appeal to the Spring/Summer season and also to revamp the style and make the younger ages more inclined to purchase or wear them proudly. From Iro and Buba to T shirts to Agbani Darego jeans, how could you go wrong? Most definitely a personal favourite of mine - Ikeja City Mall, Alausa, Ikeja and Centro Lekki Mall, Admiralty Way, Lekki Phaseimage
  • Trinkets and treasures: This is an uber chic, modern jewellery store which stocks everything from Swarovski encrusted rings to signature gold. The pieces are sourced from around the globe and are then carefully categorised into Seasonal collections depending on that seasons trend - for instance this year’s Summer collection was dominated by a warm rose gold hue to contrast with the predominant orange colour for the AW14 season. This then makes pairing jewellery and outfits easier for clients - how nifty! Be sure of nothing but the best customer service and also take a look at exclusive collections in stores now! image

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  • Isale Eko: The first day I walked through this market I was completely lost at the size of it. With every corner we turned there was a burst of colour, soft breeze blowing all types of ankara, chiffon, lace and silk around. It was such an intense walk but I loved everything I had seen! This is one of the best places to shop in Nigeria, especially as a first timer - the hustle and bustle of the market not only startles you but it makes you realise how fierce Nigerians are in terms of their trade - which I absolutely adore! Not only this, but it caters to everyone, everywhere - the market welcomes whatever you have and with a market as huge and intense you will be sure to find what you are looking for

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  • Bere: Ibadan’s hub for traditional fashion and style teems from the centre of the city itself. From the top of this hill in Gbagi you can view the entire city and gape at its ‘legendary’ brown roofs, Bawwa tower, Cathedral and amazing landscape. This is possibly one the best places I know where 'Aso Ofi' and precious coral stones can be bought for special occassions - Usually coming to this market infers that you are getting married soon, walking through the tiny footpaths you are usually showered with blessings from the Mallams and Old women in their stalls. With an amazing atmosphere and a fierce vibe this is an amazing place to come and look at the beginning of Yoruba civilsation and also buy amazing pieces for yourself. 

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Contact me and tell me what you think! 

ourafricablog.com | taraolajide@gmail.com | Perspectivefashion.tumblr.com | Twitter @taraolajide | Instagram @tara_olajide 

(Source: ourafrica)

thefemaletyrant:

nkenten:

 

Traditional Nigerian occupations captured by documentary photographer Muyiwa Osifuye.

Cloth Weaving: Nigeria is famous for the numerous types of fabric which were traditionally woven by hand, but today modern technology has taken over. Fabrics include the famous “Aso oke”, traditionally worn by royalty but nowadays for special occasions, “Adire” or tie and dye and “Ankara” among the Yoruba and “George” among the Igbo. 

Pottery: Among the Yoruba, potters were traditionally women, but in the north they were men. Traditional pots were made for ritual purposes, water vessels and cooking.

Palm Wine Tapping: Wine tapping is another occupation from the past which still continues today. The female or red Abe (Oil palm tree) is used for palm kernels from which you get palm oil used in cooking, manufacture of margarine and soap. The sap of the male or white Abe is used to make Palm wine, which is a popular traditional beer all over West Africa. 

Wood Carving: Wood carvers traditionally built shrines which are used to worship traditional gods and lots of their work centered around masks and figures in this regard. However, they also make lots of figure ornaments and carvings of people and animals. 

Bronze and Metal Casting: Ife and Benin are famous all over the world for their bronze and metal carvings. Traditionally a lot of these elaborate masks and carvings were made to decorate the royal palaces, or for use in ceremonial occasions and traditional shrines. Sadly a lot of these national heirlooms are now housed in museums or private collections around the world.

These are really pretty, and I love how some of these photos have younger ones in them, learning the craft and all.

But really “ankara” among the Yoruba? Ankara is not woven, it’s printed. Basically it should not have been on this list.

(via blackandstylish)

dynamicafrica:

Nigerian musician Seun Kuti speaks out on Nigeria’s anti-gay law.
I’m writing to condemn the recent anti-gay bill signed into law by our President Jonathan Goodluck. This law – which contains penalties of up to 14 years in prison for anyone in a same-sex marriage or civil union, 10 years for anyone who attends a same-sex wedding, 10 years for anyone involved with an LGBT organization, and even 10 years for anyone who shows affection for someone of the same sex – should be cast out. Since the law was passed, police across Nigeria have begun arresting and torturing dozens of our fellow citizens suspected of being gay. Don’t forget that in some of our states, if you are found guilty of being gay, you could be stoned to death.
First of all, this law was unnecessary. There is not space in the existing constitution for gay marriage. Our constitution is very definitive of marriage as a union between man and woman. I see the signing in of this law for what it was: a cheap shot by an under-achieving government to discriminate against people because they are different.
The president of Nigeria has a PhD, so he should understand better than most the implications of the law. Even if he couldn’t stop the senate from passing the bill, he had the power to delay signing it as a way of protecting the gay community. The President has had the Petroleum Industry Bill in front of him for years, and he and our senators have stalled on the bill calling for harsher punishment for corruption. Meanwhile, Nigeria’s senate has just sanctioned pedophilia in our constitution (girls that are as young as 9 years old can continue to be married in if they are “physically developed enough” according to their parents or prospective husbands) – so this the ban on homosexuality can hardly be a so-called “moral” issue. This is simply a move for cheap political points. Meanwhile, people’s lives hang in the balance.
Today I am writing this not as a fight for “gay rights”, I am fighting for all rights. People should be allowed to express themselves freely and this includes their sexuality. I believe all gay people should come out and organize openly. I expect that society should allow them live their lives as they please.
It’s not a cultural thing – it’s a sexual thing. I have even heard people say it’s Western culture imposed on us and if the West doesn’t recognize polygamy we should not accept homosexuality. This is the kind of scary ignorance that this kind of law will foster. (I can say for a fact that the constitution of Nigeria does not recognize polygamy. We have customary laws that are non-binding, but our secular courts and national constitution does not allow polygamy even though it’s “our culture.”)
I believe in education as the answer to any problem and I know this law does not educate positively. It just criminalizes and institutionalizes hate towards the gay community.
Here’s a call to action: I believe the gay community should come out! They need to put love above fear. I also believe that gay people in Africa not just Nigeria who are being targeted like this should put pressure on the West by claiming asylum in their countries. I think we are about to see a new wave of sexual refugees!
Love over fear should be the way forward.
-Seun Kuti
(via okayafrica)

dynamicafrica:

Nigerian musician Seun Kuti speaks out on Nigeria’s anti-gay law.

I’m writing to condemn the recent anti-gay bill signed into law by our President Jonathan Goodluck. This law – which contains penalties of up to 14 years in prison for anyone in a same-sex marriage or civil union, 10 years for anyone who attends a same-sex wedding, 10 years for anyone involved with an LGBT organization, and even 10 years for anyone who shows affection for someone of the same sex – should be cast out. Since the law was passed, police across Nigeria have begun arresting and torturing dozens of our fellow citizens suspected of being gay. Don’t forget that in some of our states, if you are found guilty of being gay, you could be stoned to death.

First of all, this law was unnecessary. There is not space in the existing constitution for gay marriage. Our constitution is very definitive of marriage as a union between man and woman. I see the signing in of this law for what it was: a cheap shot by an under-achieving government to discriminate against people because they are different.

The president of Nigeria has a PhD, so he should understand better than most the implications of the law. Even if he couldn’t stop the senate from passing the bill, he had the power to delay signing it as a way of protecting the gay community. The President has had the Petroleum Industry Bill in front of him for years, and he and our senators have stalled on the bill calling for harsher punishment for corruption. Meanwhile, Nigeria’s senate has just sanctioned pedophilia in our constitution (girls that are as young as 9 years old can continue to be married in if they are “physically developed enough” according to their parents or prospective husbands) – so this the ban on homosexuality can hardly be a so-called “moral” issue. This is simply a move for cheap political points. Meanwhile, people’s lives hang in the balance.

Today I am writing this not as a fight for “gay rights”, I am fighting for all rights. People should be allowed to express themselves freely and this includes their sexuality. I believe all gay people should come out and organize openly. I expect that society should allow them live their lives as they please.

It’s not a cultural thing – it’s a sexual thing. I have even heard people say it’s Western culture imposed on us and if the West doesn’t recognize polygamy we should not accept homosexuality. This is the kind of scary ignorance that this kind of law will foster. (I can say for a fact that the constitution of Nigeria does not recognize polygamy. We have customary laws that are non-binding, but our secular courts and national constitution does not allow polygamy even though it’s “our culture.”)

I believe in education as the answer to any problem and I know this law does not educate positively. It just criminalizes and institutionalizes hate towards the gay community.

Here’s a call to action: I believe the gay community should come out! They need to put love above fear. I also believe that gay people in Africa not just Nigeria who are being targeted like this should put pressure on the West by claiming asylum in their countries. I think we are about to see a new wave of sexual refugees!

Love over fear should be the way forward.

-Seun Kuti

(via okayafrica)

(via vulvita)